Dusheha – Vijayadashami

Vijayadashami also known as Dashahara, Dussehra, Navratri or Durgotsav is one of the most important Hindu festivals celebrated in various forms, across India, Nepal and Bangladesh.
The name Dussehra is derived from Sanskrit Dasha-hara literally means remover of ten referring to Lord Rama’s victory over the ten-headed demon king Ravana. The day also marks the victory of Goddess Durga over the demons Mahishasur. The name Vijayadashami is also derived from the Sanskrit words “Vijaya-dashmi” literally meaning the victory on the dashmi (Dashmi being the tenth lunar day of the Hindu calendar month).

Read More about Vajayadashami at Wikipedia

Ramlila (literally ‘Rama’s lila or play’) is a dramatic folk re-enactment of the life of Lord Ram, ending up in ten day battle between Lord Ram and Ravan, as described in the Hindu religious epic, the Ramayana. A tradition that originates from the Indian subcontinent, the play is staged annually often over ten or more successive nights, during the auspicious period of ‘Sharad Navratras’, which marks the commencement of the Autumn festive period, starting with the Dussehra festival. Usually the performances are timed to culminate on the festival of Vijayadashami day, that commemorates the victory of Lord Ram over demon king Ravana, when the actors are taken out in a procession through the city, leading up to a mela ground or town square, where the enactment of the final battle takes place, before giant effigies of Ravana, his brother Kumbhakaran and son Meghanath are set fire, and coronation or abhisheka of Rama at Ayodhya takes place, marking the culmination of festivities and restoration of the divine order.

Rama is the 7th incarnation of Vishnu and central figure of the Ramayana. The Ramayana is based on the life, times and values of Lord Rama. Lord Rama is called the Maryada Purushottam or ‘The best among the dignified’. The story of Lord Rama and his comrades is so popular in India that it has actually amalgamated the psyche of the Indian mainstream irrespective of their religion. The very story of Ramayana injects ethics to the Indian mainstream.

Read more about Ramlila at Wikipedia

glimpse of Ramlila on the occasion of Dushehra

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About The Author

Vinod Rawat

I'm a very patient listener with positive attitude towards work and life. I'm kind of innovative and creative, I keep learning things and try to implement them to the best use possible. Sometimes I love to write a little and share with the world, sometimes I stay busy at work or family. Professionally I'm a Web & Graphic Designer and also a Pro Marketer. I have over 12 years of working experience in Sales & Marketing, Graphic and Web Design. Explored many areas of business. Sometimes I do love to travel.

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